Profile 

 

Kayoko is a Classical pianist brought up in German and Russian traditions and with a passion for French music. She was from the early age exposed to

influences of both Russian and German Schools of piano playing, when she studied at Mukogawa Women's University Japan with Boris Bekhterev and

with the late Naoyuki Inoue, himself a pupil of Rudolf Serkin. She also holds a Master's degree from Moscow State Conservatoire named after P.I.Tchaikovsky, where she studied with the illustrated name of Mikhail Petukhov, a pupil of Dmitri Shostakovich, protégé of Sviatoslav Richter, and one of the last representatives of the school of the legendary Tatiana Nikolaeva, him being her assistant.
Kayoko participated in Master Classes by Pierre Reach and Vladimir Viardo at Academy Gyorgy Sebok, and performed in Festival Piano Pyrenees in France.
During her student days in Russia, Kayoko gave a solo recital, played on Heinrich Neuhaus's piano at Pasternak House Museum Peredelkino, in Rachmaninov Hall of Moscow Conservatoire, and participated in Taneyev International Music Festival in Dyutkovo Zvenigorod. She was invited to perform in a series of concerts in memory of the great Russian literary figures at venues including Lermontov Museum, Chekhov Museum, Gorky Institute, Nekrasov Library, Moscow State University and Schepkin Museum.
Kayoko is an experienced Chamber Musician. In Japan, replacing Boris Bekhterev, she appeared a number of times in Russian Embassy, both as soloist and accompanist. For several years she participated in the Kobe Memorial production of Verdi Requiem. She and her husband, a former pianist Dong-Jun Ha, were a Piano Duo. In 2005 they played in Kobe International Competition and received an award. They had studied with the Golden Duet of Elena Sorokina and Aleksandr Bakhchiev, the Presidents of the Russian Association of Piano Duet. She formed a chamber group again in Sydney Australia also, Trio Kajika, with musician friends of hers.
Having very small hands, she has yet to meet any pianist with smaller hands than hers. Kayoko is grateful for such physical difficulties, which she approaches philosophically, allowing her to place greater emphasis on subtle tone colours, historical and stylistic honesty of interpretation, rather than artificial displays of technique. Her technique is one of graceful agility and flexibility, rather than power. Her guidance is helping greatly a number of young pianists, who had stiff hands and fixed minds.
Kayoko now lives in Sydney Australia where she studies privately with Phillip Shovk, runs a home studio, and prepares future performances. She has played at Sydney Opera House, Crows Nest Performing Arts Centre, and Lindfield Uniting Church. She has recorded for ABC Classics.